Menu
Fireflies in Fukui,Lighting our way into summer
Measures of a healthy environment
September 19th, 2017
by Yoshihiro Hosokawa

The start of summer in Japan is traditionally announced by the appearance of fireflies.  Every year in June, these tiny, fantastic insects illuminate the darkness like dancing fairies.  They are plentiful in Fukui, particularly in Satoyama, an area of outstanding natural beauty, close to where Fukui locals live.  When you take a photo of glowing fireflies, you will be able to see rays of light bursting from them.   If you have a chance to see them at their peak, you will be amazed by the sight of countless little lights dancing around before your eyes.

Luciola cruciata, aquatic fireflies which live at the water’s edge, are the most famous kind of firefly in Japan.  They are between 1.5 and 2 cm long, and the males fly around, with their bright lights glowing, to attract females.  Their eggs are laid on moss, the larva live in fresh water, they change into cocoons in soil, and finally, they fly in the air.  In this way, the lifecycle of Luciola cruciata takes in all forms of the natural environment: water, soil, grass and air.   This balance needs to be prefect in order for them to thrive. This is the reason why Luciola cruciata are viewed in Japan as a measure of a healthy and clean environment.

Terrestrial fireflies, which are most often seen in the dense forests of Europe, might only be treated as curiosities there.  In Japan, however, aquatic fireflies are held in high regard, and are seen as something unique and wonderful, which enriches the Japanese landscape and natural environment.

Luciola cruciata can be seen flying around the water’s edge only for a short time each year; once flying, they live just for two weeks.  Japanese people feel great affection for the brief, transient life of the firefly; there is something deeply romantic and poignant about the delicate way in which fireflies shine their lights even until the last moments of their lives.

There is a strong sense of nostalgia attached to the firefly.  Before the 1960’s, there were much greater numbers of fireflies, that thrived in the unspoiled Japanese natural environment.  Children would wander down to the riverbanks, hand in hand with their grandfathers.  They enjoyed catching fireflies with nets or even brooms.  Fireflies were used to teach children about how imperfect, impermanent and incomplete life could be.

Fireflies began to decline following the rapid rise of Japanese industrial and economic growth, due to the destruction and pollution of natural habitats; waste drainage from the factories flowed into rivers, and farmers began to use agricultural chemicals to grow rice more efficiently.  Streams, where water for agricultural use was taken from, had their bottoms and sides covered not with soil but with concrete.  Thiaridal snails, which were the only source of food for the larva of fireflies, couldn’t live there anymore, and as a result, fireflies began to disappear.

As we entered the 2000s, many local campaigns were launched to reintroduce fireflies to areas all over Fukui.  For example, the local inhabitants of the Ago area raise the eggs of fireflies in a special environment and release the larva and imago into the Misarage River.  They have also continued to clean the river for many years until they saw the increasing number of fireflies.  Now, the Ago area is well-known for fireflies, and local maps are produced, showing visitors the best places to find fireflies.

The Fukui Firefly Association, which provides research and works towards the preservation of fireflies, helps educate children about the importance of conserving the natural environment.  Mr. Masao Yamashita, the chief guide of this group, tells people, “The areas you can see fireflies in are also the safest and healthiest environments for us to live.  Let’s preserve the ecological balance of these areas, with traditional methods.”

What children are watching is the imago and eggs of fireflies collected in the Misarage River.  These children from the city are fascinated by what they see with their own eyes.   They are overjoyed and can be heard exclaiming, “How nice!” and “This is like the illuminations.”  They are full of wonder at the sight of fireflies dancing around this 1 kilometer stretch of the river.

Fukui Prefecture has many rivers where you can enjoy nature: the Kuzuryu River, the Asuwa River, the Hino River, and the Kita River.  The Fukui Firefly Association publishes maps showing the best places to view fireflies, along these riverbanks.

Fireflies can live only for a short time, and they dislike strong lights; people who visit to view fireflies usually have to turn off their car headlights or flashlights.  Even if you happen to catch fireflies, it is good manners to release them back into the wild afterwards.  These scenes of fireflies flying and glowing is a treasured asset to the local areas, which have been inherited, restored and preserved with great care.

 

福井のホタル、夏の風物詩

環境の指標

 日本でホタルは、夏の始まりを告げる風物詩として、昔から多くの人に親しまれてきました。ホタルは里山に生息し、6月ごろになると、ごく小さな光を放ちながら夜を飛び回ります。福井は、豊かな自然環境が保たれているため、あちこちにホタルの生息地があり、地域住民自慢の鑑賞スポットが数多く存在しています。ゆっくりと点滅するホタルは、写真に収めると、光の帯を描きます。あなたがもし、ベストシーズンに訪れることができたら、無数の光が乱舞する幻想的な光景を目の当たりにし、きっと心を奪われることでしょう。

 日本で最も有名なホタルは、水辺にすんでいるゲンジボタルです。体長は1・5~2センチ。飛び交うのはほとんどがオスで、オスはお尻の部分を特に強く光らせます。草むらにじっとしているメスにアピールして、出会いを求めるためです。交尾をすると、水辺のコケに卵が産み付けられます。卵から生まれた幼虫は水中で生活し、土にもぐってサナギとなり、土から出てきて成虫となって飛び立ちます。つまり、ゲンジボタルは、水や土、草、空気といった水辺の環境すべてを使って、一生を過ごすのです。そのため、自然環境が十分に整っている限られた地域にしか、生息できません。ホタルが「水辺環境の指標」と言われるゆえんです。

 日本ではゲンジボタルを代表とする水生ホタルが一般的ですが、ヨーロッパなどでは山の中などをすみかとする陸生ホタルの方が多く見られます。ひょっとすると、あなたの国では、うっそうとした林の中で光る陸生ホタルの姿に対して、不気味なイメージが定着しているかもしれません。日本で、ホタルが風情を感じさせる生き物として愛されているのには、訳があります。

 

 水辺を飛び交うゲンジボタルが見られるのは、1年でたった2週間程度です。なぜなら、成虫になってからの寿命が2週間しかないからです。限られた時間を精いっぱい生き抜き、命が果てる間際まで懸命に光を放とうとするホタルの姿に、日本人ははかなさといとおしさを感じ取ります。

 

 1960年代以前は、手つかずの自然の中で今よりももっと多くのホタルが輝いていました。そのころの子どもたちは、おじいちゃんに連れられて川辺や田んぼの土手を歩き、網やほうきでホタルを捕まえて遊びました。捕まえたホタルを手のひらにそっと包み込み、優しい光を眺めながら、生き物を大切にする心を学びました。こうした思い出をよみがえらせ、郷愁を感じさせてくれるのも、ホタルが愛される理由の一つです。

 

 その後、高度経済成長期に入ると、ホタルを取り巻く環境に変化が起きました。産業の拡大で工業廃水が川に流れ込み、米作りの効率化のため田んぼには農薬が使われることが増えました。農業用水が流れる小川は、土ではなくコンクリートで側面と底が覆われるようになりました。幼虫の唯一の餌である巻き貝のカワニナがすめなくなり、ホタルは一時期どんどん姿を消していきました。

 2000年代に入ったころから、環境意識の高まりを背景に、福井の各地でホタルを呼び戻すための住民運動が起きました。例えば、福井市の安居地区の住民は、未更毛川のホタルを復活させようと、採集した卵を特別な環境で育てて、幼虫や成虫の放流を続けました。きれいな川を取り戻すための清掃活動を何年も重ねた末、再びホタルが増えていき、今では、福井でも有数の鑑賞スポットとして知られるようになりました。住民グループが生息地のマップをつくり、毎年訪れる人たちを案内しています。

 

 ホタルの調査・保全に取り組む「福井県ホタルの会」は、子どもたち向けの講座で、ホタルの生態を教え、身近な自然環境を守っていくことの大切さを伝えています。顧問の山下征夫さんは「ホタルが飛んでいる地域は、農作物も安全で、人も住みやすい。昔からあるその土地の生態系を守っていこう」と呼び掛けます。

 

 子どもたちが見つめているのは、未更毛川で採集されたホタルの成虫や卵です。市街地から訪れた子どもは、間近で見る本物のホタルの姿に興味津々です。観察会では、未更毛川沿い約1キロにわたってホタルが乱舞する光景を眺め、「うわーきれい」「イルミネーションみたい」と感激していました。

 

 福井県には、九頭竜川や足羽川、日野川、北川といった自然に恵まれた河川がたくさん流れています。福井県ホタルの会がまとめたマップには、生息が確認された各地の鑑賞スポットが記されていて、ホタルを見つけるための参考になるでしょう。

 ホタルは寿命の短い繊細な生き物です。強い光を嫌うので、鑑賞に訪れた人たちは、車のヘッドライトや懐中電灯を消して、そっと見守ります。もし捕まえても、持ち帰らず、すぐに自然に放してあげるのがマナーです。ホタルが飛び交う光景は地域の宝。住民たちに大事に守られ、受け継がれているのです。


RELATED STORIES
May 22nd, 2017

The Sustainable “Great Lakes”

The Five Lakes of Mikata, Mihama Town & Wakasa Town

Located just a 40 minutes’ drive south from Tsuruga Station, you’ll find the Mikata Goko (the Five Lakes of Mikata) within the Wakasa Wan Quasi-National Park. Yes, these majestic lakes are beautiful to look at, but there is more to them than meets the eye. Read on to find out...
READ MORE
March 1st, 2017

Beautiful Beach for Tomorrow

Wakasa Wada beach (Takahama town)

Oceans are valuable natural resources, which hold about 68.5 percent of water on the earth according to the USGS. It provides us with food, water and a treasured source of recreation. Moreover, it plays a critical role in removing carbon from the atmosphere and providing oxygen. The Blue Flag is...
READ MORE
November 18th, 2016

A Mossy 1300-year-old Shrine

Heisenji Hakusan Shrine (Katsuyama City)

‘A rolling stone gathers no moss’ is a common proverb in English. Coincidently, the Japanese have a similar idiom, ‘No moss grows on a rolling stone (転がる石に苔むさず)’. In Japanese, the meaning differs from the modern English interpretation of the proverb, suggesting that a person who does not settle in one...
READ MORE


TOP